Book Review – The Treason of Isengard

This book covers a somewhat small portion or timeline from the main Lord of The Rings narrative. Which in large part is do to the massive scale of the story. The Treason of Isengard starts of with the different manuscripts and drafts in the sequential order of:

  • Hobbiton to Bree
  • Bree to Rivendell
  • Council of Elrond
  • The Mines of Moria
  • Path to Lothlorien
  • The Kingdom of Rohan

One thing that struck me was the removal of characters from the story as well as the removal certain elements of the drafts that didn’t quite fit with the narrative that J.R.R. Tolkien was trying accomplish in the Lord of The Rings. Yes, sadly Tom Bombadil had a tiny portion (the strange nature of his character still intrigues me).

A very interesting thing about reading this book is that at this point, Tolkien had practically all the major plots of the Lord of The Rings already planned and laid out. By reading this book we get to see how the story keeps getting expanded to the epic literary master piece that it is.

To the surprise of many, The Lord of The Rings is a religious (Catholic) novel. Reading both The Return of The Shadow and now the Treason of Isengard, I definitely could see many elements of it. For example in this book, to me it very quite how in the early manuscripts and drafts (and even on the final publish form), Galadriel is written and described as a Virgin Mary figure, similar to Elbereth in The Return of The Shadow.

Finally in this book we get to read in more detail information about major figures in the Lord of The Rings like, Galadriel, Saruman, Treebeard and the Ents, and King Theoden.

Book Review – A Game of Thrones

When it comes to A Game of Thrones (TV show) or A Song of Ice and Fire altogether; I’m completely clueless. So when I first started reading this book, I had no idea what to expect.

I love fantasy, and epic high fantasy even more. I originally bought the mass market paperback A Song of Ice and Fire box set over two years ago. I kept on hold reading the novels because the series is not even finished! However, during my vacation I decided to finally start reading them since who knows when the hell George R. R. Martin will finish writing the whole thing.

A Game of Thrones is the first book of a fairly long saga, which as I said, it’s not yet fully completed. This book lacked the traditional fantasy elements that I adore, like fairies and mythical creatures. Instead, this book is mainly somewhat of a murder mystery with complex political intrigue.

Each chapter is based from a point of view of a certain character, and I feel this writing technique was beautifully executed by author George R. R. Martin. Practically almost at the end of each chapter, I kind of wished it kept going more given how well it captivated me. This is why I don’t think the length of the book should scare off anyone from reading this book or series. This book is really good!

I really enjoyed reading A Game of Thrones. In my opinion, perhaps the only negative or downside to this book or series in general is that from reading just this book I can’t see one main story, instead it seems this fictional universe was written with a ton of subplots which at the end all will culminate together.

This fantasy universe is very interesting, however I have a feeling I just read a small portion (albeit over 800 pages!) of what is a massive fantasy world.

PlayStation 3 Hard Drive Upgrade

Unlike the PS4, I do have a decent amount of digital games for the PS3. This, mainly because of some great Humble Bundle PlayStation bundles I’ve bought through out the years where PS3 is the platform with the most digital games in the bundle.

My PS3 originally came with just 120 GB drive, so I opted to upgrade it to a 500 GB (PS3 games are fairly small), and I must say, upgrading the hard drive on a PS4 was a significant easier process than a PS3.

Replacing the physical drive was extremely simple process as shown on this video:

 

However most of my problems were trying to install the PS3 software into the new drive. At a high level, the install process is identical to that of the PS4, https://www.playstation.com/en-ie/get-help/help-library/system—hardware/system-software/updating-the-playstation-3-system-software-using-the-safe-mode-m/. Only major caveat is that the PS3 only supports USB 2.0 drives. I have plenty of USB 2.0 drives so I initially thought this was going to be a quick 10 minute project, and boy was I mistaken.

PS3 Not Detecting UPDATE Software:

Label Drive as MBR

The major problem I encountered was the PS3 safe mode prompt not detecting the PS3 Update on the USB drive. While, the documentation states that the USB drive should be formatted as FAT16 or FAT32, it does not state what label should the hard drive have. A couple of forum posts suggest setting the USB drive with an MBR label, which I had to do since my drive was set as GPT.

Create 2GB Primary Partition on the USB Drive

After labeling the drive as MBR and reformatting it to FAT32 numerous times. The PS3 safe mode prompt still wasn’t detecting and loading the software. I even tried different USB 2.0 drives, just to verify the drive wasn’t faulty, and it still failed. I knew FAT32 has some limitations such as only supporting up 32GB partitions, however all of USB drives were 8GB so I thought this wasn’t the problem. Well I was mistaken, I partitioned my 8GB USB drive to have a single 2GB primary partition and just left the other space unallocated. Then I once again reformatted the drive as FAT32, and copied the UPDATE software to it, and lo and behold; the PS3 safe mode prompt was able to successfully load and install the PS3 OS Update software onto the new 500GB upgraded drive.

It took me about 3 hours to troubleshoot and fix the problem, but the most infuriating thing is that fact that this is not mentioned in the Sony PlayStation documentation!

 

Final steps:

  1. Label drive as MBR.
  2. Create a primary partition 2GB or smaller.
  3. Format primary partition as FAT32.
  4. Copy PS3 software to USB 2.0 drive

 

 

Book Review – The Return of the Shadow

In this sixth book of The History of Middle-Earth volume series, we finally start reading the early drafts of The Lord of the Rings. A very interesting thing about this book and the complete History of Middle-Earth is that the drafts and back history of The Hobbit are not included at all. The primary reason being was the fact when J.R.R. Tolkien first wrote The Hobbit, he didn’t originally incorporated into his mythology that he had at the time. In this book we see how a lot of the elements of his mythology that existed long before The Hobbit came to be included into the world of the Lord of the Rings. Effectively merging his work as a single monolith tapestry that we all love and cherish.

The Return of the Shadow follows the same chronological order of the chapters in The Lord of the Rings, so you’ll read different drafts of the chapters in sequential order as they occur in the final novel. Quite a lot content involves the evolution of the back story of the different Hobbits that take part of The Fellowship of the Ring. Also you’ll read and learn more about Tom Bombadil! As well as the Witchking. But perhaps the most important part, we see how the magic ring found by Bilbo in The Hobbit becomes an important element in the narrative of The Lord of The Rings. For example you’ll also read original different variations of the iconic ring verge.

To me what stood out the most was Tolkien’s first ideas regarding Aragorn’s character, and how it beautifully evolved to follow the narrative of not only the story itself, but also influencing a major of portion his legendarium.

April 2018 Favorites

Reading
This month I only read technical books. In particular AWS Certified Solutions Architect Official Study Guide: Associate Exam and Resilience and Reliability on AWS: Engineering at Cloud Scale. Though it’s just temporarily since right now I’m just focused on my completing my AWS certifications, I’ve taken a break from the traditional fantasy fiction that I’ve been reading continuously these last three years.

Gaming
This month, I finally played and beat Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus. Wow, this was an awesome first-person shooter, and the story is certainly my favorite compared to previous Wolfenstein’s games. Word of warning, the first hour in this video game, has a shit ton of polically incorect points that might trigger certain individuals. For the most part, I played this game in normal difficult mode, but compared to The Old Blood and The New Order, I found The New Colossus to be difficult game. Now talking about difficult games, this month I also started playing Nioh. Long story short, I rage quit Nioh in about an hour of playing it. It’s simply way to difficult, which I don’t really have the patience to cope with.

Wellness / Self-improvement
This month has been completely me focusing on passing the AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate Exam.

March 2018 Favorites

Reading
Reading wise, March was somewhat of a slow month. The only real reading I’ve done this past month was that of AWS Certified Solutions Architect Official Study Guide: Associate Exam book, for the technical certifications that I’m studying for.

Gaming
For gaming, I played a whole lot of Middle-Earth Shadow of War, and I must say I’m enjoying this game more than I did the original Shadow of Mordor. I’m not a big fan of stealth games, so unlike Shadow of Mordor, Shadow of War is far less punishable. It’s still a somewhat difficult game, but in general I found this new second version to be far more enjoyable than the original. About 40+ hours in, I’m able about 80% through the main story mode. This game definitely has enough content to keep you busy for over 100+ hours!

Also gaming wise, I finally finished Wolfenstein: The New Order. Overall, it’s a fantastic fps game, but I must say I think I enjoyed more Wolfenstein: The Old Blood. Finally, I started playing Nier: Automata. I’m about four hours into this game, and I’m having a hard time getting into it. Role playing games are by favorite genre of video games, however the quest and character skill system is meh. Hopefully this game will get better further more into the storyline.

Wellness / Self-improvement
During March, I did a significant amount of studying for the AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner and AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate.

Geralt of Rivia Prime 1 Statue

When The Witcher III: Wild Hunt Prime 1 statues were first announced, I told myself I was “only” going to buy the Eredin statue; so I immediately pre-ordered it. Main reason being that Eredin would  look awesome next to my Sauron statue, and like Sauron himself, both being the chief antagonists of two book and book series that I love.

Unfortunately for me, the Geralt of Rivia statue was going to be the first statue in The Witcher lineup that was going to be made and shipped out to customers. Little that I knew that Prime 1 has the bad reputation of delaying the manufactured and shipment of their statues. Yet, the small, but prevalent impatient side of me couldn’t wait for another 6 months for my Eredin statue to arrive. This being almost a 9 month delay in total! So I decided to purchase the Geralt of Rivia statue while Eredin arrives.

My Nexus 6’s camera in a low-light setting doesn’t fully portray how incredibly beautiful my statue is. This new statue is beautiful!

Hopefully, my Eredin statue finally arrives sometime in July, however I must say that now thanks to this new Geralt statue, I’ve gone ahead and pre-order the Ciri of Cintra exclusive statue. Which is scheduled to arrive sometime in July-September 2019. So knowing how Prime 1 works, it will be very likely that I’ll be receiving the Ciri of Cintra statue sometime in early or mid 2020. Now, I have a feeling that a year from now I might be seeing myself purchasing both Yennefer of Vengerberg and Triss Merigold statues to complete the entire collection, and because I was impatient to wait for the Ciri statue to arrive. Hopefully I’m mistaken given how incredibly expensive the statues are and also by the fact that I don’t know where the hell I’ll be displaying the Yennefer and Triss statues since I’m limited in space!

Man, have my original plans changed…

February 2018 Favorites

As an effort to keep myself motivated to write more on this blog, and also inspired by different YouTube channels that I’m subscribed too. Starting forward I’m going to be posting a monthly blog post which I will briefly share all the interesting things I did each month. This can includes but not limited too:

  • Books I read
  • Video games I played
  • Any new software or hardware that I worked with
  • New music I listen/discovered
  • Any new sort of self-improvement or wellness habit or activity
  • Just about anything interesting that I did the past month.

For starters, this blog post is really late, it’s March 11th, and me being a king of procrastination; I finally took the time to write up my February 2018 favorites.

Reading
Reading wise, last month I read the first two books (publication order) of The Chronicles of Narnia. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and Prince Caspian: The Return to Narnia. Both being quite enjoyable reads. My goal is the read the remaining five books this month. Also last month, I read about half of the sixth book The Complete History of Middle-Earth series, The Return of the Shadow.

Gaming
Gaming wise, last month I finally purchased and played the Horizon Zero Dawn: The Frozen Wilds expansion. Horizon Zero Dawn was my favorite game of 2017, and the expansion added a somewhat massive additional map, cool new weapons, and new machines (difficult) to battle. I’m a big fan of the story in Horizon Zero Dawn, so I hope this is the first of many games in this awesome new franchise. Lastly, last month I played, through most of the campaign of Wolfenstein: The New Order. Gameplay is really fun, however I really disliked the useless boring puzzle like missions that really don’t add much to main story.

Wellness / Self-improvement
Finally self-improvement and professionally wise, I started studying for the AWS Certified Solutions Architect – Associate certification. For the resources, I’m using courses from A Cloud Guru and Linux Academy, as well the books AWS Certified Solutions Architect Official Study Guide: Associate Exam 1st Edition and Amazon Web Services in Action.

Mechanical Keyboard


A few days ago I had to work from home, and this made me realize and appreciate how much I love my mechanical keyboard. At work I use a CM Storm Quick Fire Cherry MX Blue, while at home (desk only, since normally I’m just using a laptop) I use an old A1048 Apple Keyboard.
It wasn’t until now that I’ve realized that if I’m sitting in a desk for a long period of time, I can’t use any other keyboard other than my mechanical keyboard. It’s amazing that I’ve been a mechanical keyboard user for only for just three years and not all my adult working life thus far! What kept me from using a mechanical keyboard, and I think most people also (other than  PC gamers, of course) is the cost of a mechanical keyboards. Yet, in April 2015 I finally had had enough, using the awful A1314 Apple Keyboard and decided to finally buy a mechanical keyboard. Almost three years later, I haven’t looked back. The $120 that I originally paid for my mechanical keyboard has been totally worth it.

If you’re thinking of purchasing a mechanical keyboard, I’d recommend visiting your local electronic/computer store and see if they have sample display mechanical keyboards with the different types of keys that you can test and try out. I’m fortunate to live really close to a Micro Center Computer & Electronics store, where I was able to try out the key switches. From which of the different switches I found the Cherry MX Blue key types to feel the best for me. They’re really loud, but I absolutely love them!

I can’t think of any drawback other than the fact that it’s a wired keyboard (like mostly all mechanical keyboards). This is not a problem for me since at work I have plenty of space and having to manually plug and unplugged the keyboard to MacBook Pro is not a big deal to me.

Using a mechanical keyboard is such an enjoyable experience, I honestly can’t use anything else for my daily keyboard typing needs.

 

Book Review – The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

I’ve been reading a ton of J.R.R. Tolkien these last few months, so naturally the next step is to start reading some of C.S. Lewis’ works. I’ve started reading arguably his best known work, The Chronicles of Narnia. Like with The Hobbit, The Chronicles of Narnia is a fantasy children’s book (or series), and also just like The Hobbit, it’s unfortunate that I never was exposed to these beautiful stories as a child; neither at home or school.

Theirs a debate regarding the reading order in how one should approach reading The Chronicles of Narnia. That is reading the books in their original publication or chronological order. Though their is no right or wrong answer, from what I can see online, it seems to me the best option is to read the books is in their original publication order. So this is what I did. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is the first book in The Chronicles of Narnia series. The book’s main protagonists are four young children and one main antagonist. Before reading this book, I’d imagine The Chronicles of Narnia to be completely high fantasy without any contemporary elements (similar to Tolkien’s legendarium). I was mistaken, while Narnia is completely fictional secondary world with many mythical creatures, the stories’ main protagonists are Englishmen and women during the WWII era (book was published post WWII).

This is the first book of a seven book series, so it might be an inaccurate assumption to do, but reading just The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, it feels to me that The Chronicles of Narnia is a not an epic story (large in scope) with vast array of characters and many subplots.

This was such an enjoyable read, I practically read almost the entire book in one sit-in, completely oblivious from time.